Written Debates

Written Debate: The Cessation of the Miraculous Gifts

We are pleased to bring you a formal written debate on the issue of the cessation or continuance of the miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit. Mr. Richard Jackson will affirm– at the appropriate time– the continuance of the charismata in the church today. I will affirm the cessation of the gifts in AD 70. Below is my first affirmative.

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Don K. Preston

 

 

JACKSON-PRESTON FORMAL WRITTEN DEBATE

PROPOSITION: “The scriptures teach that all miracles & gifts of the Holy Spirit ceased at or by the time of the fall of Jerusalem in the first century.”

Affirm: Don K. Preston

Deny: Richard Jackson

 

Let me begin by saying that I am honored to engage in this debate with Mr .Jackson. In our private correspondence he seems like a genuinely nice man, with a true love for the Lord and His word.

 

Let me say that this debate is not about the power of prayer, or whether God heals folks in response to prayer, or whether God is involved in the affairs of the world, through prayer. I have personally experienced what I sincerely believe to be the power of prayer in my life and that of family and others. However, none of those situations were “miraculous” in the sense that we are discussing here.

 

Also, I pledge to Mr. Jackson and the readers of this debate that on my part, the debate will be without rancor or name calling. I will not be labeling Mr. Jackson as a heretic or questioning his integrity as a believer in the Lord. To be sure, I will, as I am sure Mr. Jackson will do, press my points, but, I will do so as a Christian gentleman, keeping the mandate of 2 Timothy 2:24 ever before me.

 

Finally, this debate is not about personal experiences, what has, or has not been seen, heard or felt. This debate is about what the Bible says, and nothing else. While I have repeatedly challenged invited numerous charismatic pastors to prove that they possessed the miraculous power of the Spirit to raise the dead, heal the terminally ill, etc., that will not be done in this debate, because the propositions do not call for either Mr. Jackson or myself to prove anything from experience or lack thereof. This debate is about “What says the scripture?”

 

Let me begin by defining my terms:

By “the scriptures” I mean all 66 books of the Bible.

By teach, I mean that the Bible imparts and conveys the truth.

By “all miracles and gifts of the Holy Spirit” I mean all miracles such as speaking in tongues, raising the dead, uttering inspired prophecy, etc., as super-naturally empowered by the Holy Spirit, precisely like the apostles and prophets of the first century were empowered.

By ceased, I mean ceased to function and ceased to be offered to believers, having fulfilled their function.

By “at or by the time of the fall of Jerusalem in the first century” I think is self explanatory. That is the point of time, i.e by AD 70, when all of the miraculously empowered gifts of the Holy Spirit, ceased to actively be offered to believes and actively function within the body of Christ.

 

If Mr. Jackson would like for me to clarify any of these definitions he has but to ask. Now to my affirmative.

In our private correspondence I asked Mr. Jackson some written questions.

 

1.)

I asked when the prophecy of the seventy weeks (Daniel 9:24-27) was or will be fulfilled. His response is that part of it is fulfilled while some elements remain to be fulfilled.

2.)

I likewise asked him if he believes that there are today, operative in the church, inspired apostles and / or prophets who utter infallible truths. Richard noted, correctly, that prophets and apostles uttered inspired declarations and truths that were not necessarily inscripturated, (written down as scripture), but were nonetheless inspired and infallible. (I agree with this assessment).

Mr. Jackson said: “My answer is a qualified NO.” I asked Richard if we today are living in the last days foretold by Joel 2:28f. He responded: “Strangely enough…with all of it’s seeming contradictory complexities…yes I do.”

3.)

4.)

I asked when “that which is perfect” of 1 Corinthians 13 will arrive, and Richard responded: “Here the apostle refers to that absolute perfect state of all things which is to be ushered in at the return of Jesus the Christ from Heaven.”

 

I asked him some other questions which will also come into play as we proceed, but for my first affirmative, these will suffice.

 

Before we proceed, let me say that I fully agree with Richard that “that which is perfect” was to arrive (and, I affirm, did) at the coming of the Lord. I posit that return of the Lord at the end of the Old Covenant age in the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. I will present an affirmative argument to that very effect.

 

Here is my first affirmative:

Richard and I both agree that scripture affirms the cessation of the operation of the miraculous gifts at the end of the age at the coming of Christ.

Richard affirms that the “end of the age” when the miraculous gifts cease is the end of the current Christian age.

Here is where the differences lie, to great extent. Let me put my argument simply, and then support it.

The miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit as practiced by the first century church were to end at the end of the age (Jackson and Preston agree).

But, the Christian age has no end.

Therefore, the miraculous gifts of the Spirit, while determined to end at the end of the age, are not to end at the end of the Christian age.

The miraculous gifts must have ended at the end of some other age beside the Christian age.

 

Biblically, the only age that was to end is the Mosaic Covenant age. Catch the power of that statement!

The Mosaic Covenant– and thus, the Mosaic Covenant age– was to end with the coming of the New Covenant (Jeremiah 31:29f).

The Mosaic Covenant was nigh unto passing away in the first century (Hebrews 8:13)

As we will see below, Israel’s power, her covenant relationship with God, would end at the end of the age (Daniel 12:4-7).

On the other hand, the New Covenant age of Christ will never pass away.

Ephesians 3:20-21– affirms the endlessness of Christ’s church and church age: “Unto him be glory in the church, by Jesus Christ, through all ages, age without end.” F. F. Bruce said that the Greek of the text is the strongest expression in the Greek language for endlessness.

Jesus said that his word– the gospel, New Covenant– will never pass away (Matthew 24:35).

Hebrews 12:28 affirms that the kingdom that the first century saints were then receiving can never be shaken and removed.

 

Notice now: The NT writers affirm that the end of the age was near in the first century.

Jesus said the end of the age– which of course would be when the gifts would cease– would be when Daniel 12:3 was fulfilled (Matthew 13:39-43). But, Daniel 12 and the end of the age would be fulfilled “when the power of the holy people is completely shattered” (Daniel 12:7). Thus, the end of the age–when the charismata would cease to function– would be at the end of the age when the power of the holy people was completely shattered. That was in AD 70.

Christ appeared at the end of the age (Hebrews 9:26).

Paul said the end of the age had arrived (1 Corinthians 10:11). Hopefully more on this later.

Peter affirmed: “The end of all things has drawn nigh” (1 Peter 4:7). He also said “the time (literally, the appointed time), for the (not just “a judgment”) judgment has come” (1 Peter 4:17).

 

So,

The miraculous gifts of the Spirit were to cease their function at the end of the age.

The Christian age has no end.

The Mosaic Covenant age was to end, and it is the only age in scripture that was to end.

The disciples well understood that the end of the age would be when the temple was destroyed (Matthew 24:2-3).

The end of the Mosaic Covenant age was at hand and coming soon in the first century, and arrived in AD 70.

But, since the Christian age has no end, and the only age that was to end was the Mosaic Covenant age, this demands that the miraculous gifts of the Spirit ceased at the end of the Mosaic Covenant age in AD 70.

 

Unless Mr. Jackson can prove that the Christian age will end– which he cannot do– then my affirmative and my position is vindicated, and his is falsified.

 

My second affirmative builds on the first and is based on Daniel 9:24-27:

“Seventy weeks are determined For your people and for your holy city, To finish the transgression, To make an end of sins, To make reconciliation for iniquity, To bring in everlasting righteousness, To seal up vision and prophecy, And to anoint the Most Holy. Know therefore and understand, That from the going forth of the command To restore and build Jerusalem Until Messiah the Prince, There shall be seven weeks and sixty–two weeks; The street shall be built again, and the wall, Even in troublesome times. And after the sixty–two weeks Messiah shall be cut off, but not for Himself; And the people of the prince who is to come Shall destroy the city and the sanctuary. The end of it shall be with a flood, And till the end of the war desolations are determined. Then he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week; But in the middle of the week He shall bring an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall be one who makes desolate, Even until the consummation, which is determined, is poured out on the desolate.” (NKJV which is what I will be using in these discussions)

 

Note the following critical elements:

A.) The prophecy has to do with Israel and her promises. It is not about the church or the end of the Christian age. By the very nature of the case, fulfillment of Daniel 9 is confined to Israel and her covenant age. Daniel 9 is about the end of the Mosaic Covenant age– the only age that was to end.

B.) The prophecy irrefutably refers to and includes the AD 70 destruction of Jerusalem (v. 26), as virtually all dispensationalists agree. If Mr. Jackson disagrees, he can tell us and why. I certainly do not want to misrepresent his views.

C. The prophecy anticipated the complete and final fulfillment of all prophecy, and the termination of the prophetic (charismatic) office: “Seventy weeks are determined…to seal vision and prophecy.” This point is not only conceded, but affirmed by virtually all conservative scholarship, regardless of affiliation. Let me offer just a few quotes from my book Seal Up Vision and Prophecy (www.Amazon.com).

 

 

1.)

“Prophecies and prophets are sealed, when by the full realization of all prophecies prophecy ceases, no more prophets any more appear.”(Keil and Delitzsch, Commentary on the Old Testament, Vol. 9, (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1975) 344).

2.)

“The impression of translators being that all visions and prophecies were to receive completed fulfillment in the course of these seventy weeks. It appears…, to be more agreeable to the context to suppose that the prophet is speaking of the absolute cessation of all prophecy. I Cor. 13:8” (Charles John Ellicott, Commentary on the Whole Bible, (Cassell and Co., London, 1884)387).

3.) “The vision and prophet will be sealed, that is accredited, because their final accomplishment has been reached in those events of blessing for God’s earthly people.” (A. C. Gaebelein, The Prophet Daniel, (Kregel, 1968)133).

 

4.)

“The reference is not to the accrediting of the prophecy, but to sealing it up so that it will no longer appear. Its functions are finished and it is not henceforth needed” (Edward J. Young, The Prophecy of Daniel, (Grand Rapids, Eerdmans, 1953)200).

5.)

“The words taken together refer to the final fulfillment of revelation and prophecy, i.e., when their functions are shown to be finished.” (James Leon Wood, A Commentary on Daniel, (Grand Rapids, Zondervan, 1973)250).

 

Many more citations could be given, but these should suffice: seal up vision and prophecy means the certification of the prophets through fulfillment and the cessation of the prophetic office. Thus, to put it another way: “seventy weeks are determined, for fulfillment of all prophecy and the cessation of the prophetic office (i.e. the charismata).” Now, let me present my argument in simple form, and then support it textually.

Seventy weeks were determined, for fulfillment of all prophecy and the cessation of the prophetic office (the charismata, Daniel 9:24-27).

 

But, the seventy weeks extended no further than the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70.

 

Therefore, the fulfillment of all prophecy and the cessation of the charismata was no later than AD 70.

 

My major premise has been demonstrated.

My minor premise is demonstrated by the text of Daniel 9:24-27– seventy weeks were determined on the people of Israel and on Jerusalem. Thus, the terminus of the vision is unambiguously concerned with the final fate of Jerusalem. That is the end of the seventy weeks.

 

Verse
26 clearly affirms the coming destruction of Jerusalem: “And after the sixty–two weeks …the people of the prince who is to come Shall destroy the city and the sanctuary.”

Verse 27 continues the discussion of the fate of Jerusalem: “The end of it shall be with a flood, And till the end of the war desolations are determined.”

Some translations render v. 27 as “the end thereof.” But notice that the antecedent referent to “the end of it” or “the end thereof” is directly back to v. 26 and the prediction of the destruction of Jerusalem– which is, again, almost universally admitted to be referent to AD 70.

Notice that v. 27 likewise says “till the end of the war, desolations are determined.” The end of what war? The war of v. 26 that would be the war of AD 66-70 and that would bring desolation to “the people and the city!”

There is no 2000 year gap between v. 26 and v. 27. It is a united discussion of “the war” that would bring an end to the city.

 

Notice now:

The city and sanctuary would be destroyed.

It would be destroyed after the sixty two weeks (which of course is actually after the 69th week). Thus, the destruction of the city lies within, but at the end of, the seventieth week “the end of it will be with a flood and till the end of the war desolations are determined.”

 

Notice now a corollary but critical element: The establishment of the everlasting (unending!) kingdom would come at the end of the seventieth week. This is universally agreed to by millennialists. I can cite many sources if necessary. If Mr. Jackson disagrees he can tell us why.

 

So, the end of the charismata, the fulfillment of all prophecy, and the establishment of the kingdom all lie at the end of the seventieth week. Thus, “the end” of the city and sanctuary and the establishment of the kingdom go hand in hand. (See Luke 21:20-32 for a direct commentary on this).

 

Notice now what John the Baptizer and Jesus said: “Repent for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (literally, “has drawn near”); “The time is fulfilled, the kingdom of God has drawn near” (Mark 1:15; cf. Matthew 4:17).

 

Here is my argument based on these facts:

The establishment of the kingdom, the fulfillment of all prophecy and the end of the charismata, all lie at the end of the seventieth week.

 

But, John the Immerser and Jesus affirmed that the establishment of the kingdom (and by implication the fulfillment of all prophecy and the end of the charismata which was attendant with the full establishment of the kingdom), had drawn near when they spoke.

 

Therefore, the end of the seventieth week (and by implication the fulfillment of all prophecy and the end of the charismata) was near when John and Jesus spoke in Matthew 3 and Mark 1.

Now, of course, most dispensationalists tell us that due to the Jewish rejection of Jesus, the prophetic countdown was interrupted. God postponed the seventieth week and a so far 2000 year gap has existed between the sixty ninth and seventieth week. (See my full refutation of the Gap Theory in my Seal Up Vision and Prophecy book). If however, there was not to be a 2000 year gap between the sixty ninth and seventieth week, then clearly that view is falsified. If I can prove that the fall of Jerusalem was to be the fulfillment of Daniel’s prophecy, then my proposition is established.

 

THERE WAS NO 2000 YEAR GAP

BETWEEN THE SIXTY NINTH AND SEVENTIETH WEEK OF DANIEL 9

It can be definitively proven from Daniel 9 that there was no 2000 year gap between the sixty ninth and seventieth week.

Fact:

Seventy weeks were determined, to put an end of sin and to make the atonement (Daniel 9:24). The terms to make the Atonement refers to the process, the ritual if you please, of making the Atonement.

So, the making of the Atonement and the putting away of sin belongs to the seventy week countdown. They are inextricably tied to the prophetic countdown. Not outside of it.

 

Fact:

The death of Jesus was for the purpose of making the Atonement and to put away sin (Hebrews 9:26– His death initiated the Atonement process. His coming [parousia] would perfect it, Hebrews 9:28): “Now once, at the end of the age has Christ appeared, to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself.” (The end of the age is referent to the seventieth week!)

Fact

: The death of Messiah– to put away sin and to make the Atonement– was to be, “after the sixty two weeks” (after the sixty ninth week).

So, here is my argument:

Seventy weeks were determined to make the Atonement and put away sin. (That is, the making of the Atonement and the putting away of sin belongs to the seventieth week. It does not lie outside of the seventieth week).

The death of Messiah to make the Atonement and to put away sin would be after the sixty ninth week (Daniel 9:26).

Therefore, the death of Messiah to make the Atonement and to put away sin was in the seventieth week.

The death of Jesus, to make the Atonement, was part of the seventy week countdown, and integral to it. This totally nullifies the idea of a 2000 year gap between the sixty ninth and the seventieth week, and, it likewise demands that the cessation of the charismata was not delayed for 2000 years!

Now notice that just like the death of Messiah was after the sixty ninth week, but, belongs to the seventy weeks, the destruction of Jerusalem likewise belongs to the seventy weeks: “Seventy weeks are determined… on your city” (Daniel 9:24). Notice also the coordinating conjunction that speaks of the death of Messiah and the fall of the city in v. 26. “Messiah will be cut off, but not for himself and the people of the prince that shall come will destroy the city.”

Both the death of Messiah to make the Atonement and the destruction of the city lie within the seventy weeks!

Now in anticipation of the objection that there was a 40 year gap between the death of Messiah and the fall of the city, I would note that my view of the seventy weeks is not one of mathematical calculation. In other words, I do not hold to a 483 year period. I hold to the idea that the seventy weeks is a symbolic period, with a beginning point (the decree to rebuild the city) and an ending point, the AD 70 catastrophe. The very term “seventy weeks” should cue us in that this is a symbolic reference. Furthermore, the referent to the seventy weeks has to do with the Jubilee concept, which of course was typological.

My argument is that because the Jews knew of the beginning point and an ending point, with intervening events, they could know when the terminus was near, (thus, Matthew 3:2; Mark 1:15) but, they could not know “the day or the hour.” This is why Jesus told the disciples that the appearance of the signs would let them know when his parousia, and thus the kingdom, was near (Matthew 24:32). The signs were to indicate the imminent end of the seventy weeks!

The point is that the actual text of Daniel 9 does not allow a huge gap of time. It says seventy weeks were determined on the people and the city, and, “the end of it,” the end of the city, belonged to the seventy weeks just as surely as the death of Messiah to make the Atonement!

To buttress this point, we ask: Can we prove that all prophecy was to be fulfilled in AD 70, and thus, by implication, that the end of the proph
etic office occurred at that time? The answer is yes.

Note the text of Luke 21:20-24: “And when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that the desolation thereof is nigh. Then let them which are in Judaea flee to the mountains; and let them which are in the midst of it depart out; and let not them that are in the countries enter thereinto. For these be the days of vengeance, that all things which are written may be fulfilled.

But woe unto them that are with child, and to them that give suck, in those days! for there shall be great distress in the land, and wrath upon this people. And they shall fall by the edge of the sword, and shall be led away captive into all nations: and Jerusalem shall be trodden down of the Gentiles, until the times of the Gentiles be fulfilled.”

Notice several facts:

1.) Jesus is unambiguously predicting the AD 70 fall of Jerusalem. Dispensationalists fully agree with this.

2.) Jesus was, therefore, predicting the fall of Jerusalem foretold by Daniel 9:26!

3.) But, we have shown that the destruction of Jerusalem foretold by Daniel 9:26 was included within the seventy weeks: “Seventy weeks are determined on your city…the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary…the end of it shall be with a flood.”

4.) Daniel 9:24 said that by the terminus of the seventy weeks– which included the fall of Jerusalem– all prophecy would be fulfilled– thus, the prophetic office and the charismata would end.

5.) In Luke 21:22 Jesus said, “These be the days of vengeance in which all things that are written (this is “the vision and prophecy” of Daniel 9:24!!), must be fulfilled.”

Let me frame my argument succinctly:

Seventy weeks were determined for the fulfillment of all prophecy and the cessation of the prophetic office (the cessation of the charismata).

But, Jesus said “all things that are written” would be fulfilled in the events of the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70 (Luke 21:22).

Therefore, the end of the prophetic office (the end of the charismata) occurred in the events of the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70.

Now, I fully understand that the word “all” can have a limited definition. That is not the issue. By citing other passages that discuss other topics where “all” is limited in scope will not negate my point. Note the following:

Daniel foretold the fulfillment of all vision and prophecy by the end of the seventy weeks at the destruction of Jerusalem.

Jesus predicted the very thing foretold by Daniel in regard to the destruction of Jerusalem.

He said that in that event “all things that are written must be fulfilled.”

The burden of proof is on friend Jackson to demonstrate exegetically and contextually why the “all things written” in Luke is not the “seal up vision and prophecy” of Daniel 9.

Did Jesus have a different “all things that are written” in mind from “seal up vision and prophecy”? If so, we will demand the proof.

How is “vision and prophecy” exclusive of “all things that are written,” or, how much “vision and prophecy” is excluded from “all things that are written”? We will press for textual and exegetical answers.

Notice now that friend Richard has stated that there are no inspired prophets around today. Does this not demand therefore, that “vision and prophecy” have been fulfilled and the prophetic office has ceased? If not, why not?

The prophetic office would cease when vision and prophecy was fulfilled. Jesus said “all things written” would be fulfilled in AD 70, and Mr. Jackson says we no longer have inspired, infallible prophets operative in the church today. The inexorable conclusion is that the charismata have ended.

Interestingly, however, Mr. Jackson also he says that we are in the last days foretold by Joel 2. This presents a daunting problem. Joel said that in the last days, “your son’s and daughters shall prophesy” (Joel 2:28f). So, if we are in the last days there should be inspired, infallible prophets (Again, I agree with Mr. Jackson that not all prophets delivered inspired written scripture, so it will not do to argue this). The point is that if we are in the last days foretold by Joel, there should be inspired, infallible prophets operating in the church. If there are no inspired, infallible prophets operating in the church today then this means one of two things:

A.) We are not in the last days foretold by Joel. (If we are not in the last days foretold by Joel, there is no ground for the claim to the charismata at all).

B.) The charismata have ended.

It will do no good to say that the inspired prophets are not operative in the church today because of “the apostasy.” In the OT, the inspired prophets were operative precisely because of apostasy! Furthermore, one cannot argue that there are tongues, or healings, even exorcisms, and exclude the presence of inspired prophets. All the gifts were operative synchronously in the NT (1 Corinthians 12-13). So, if there are no inspired prophets today, then there should not be– there is not– the operation of the tongues and miraculous healings, words of wisdom, etc.

Let me offer a second affirmative argument as a corollary to the first. The second affirmative is likewise from Daniel, this time, from chapter 12.

Notice first of all that the prophecy of Daniel 10-12 is a single prophetic discourse.

Notice that it is explicitly concerned with Israel and her history (Daniel 10:14), exactly as Daniel 9.

The prophecy is concerned with Israel’s fate “in the latter days.”

This has nothing to do with the end of human history, the last days of the Christian age.

Note now that Daniel 12:1 foretold the time of the Great Tribulation.

Daniel 12:2 foretold the resurrection to eternal life.

Daniel 12:3 foretold the establishment of the kingdom, i.e. when the righteous would shine (Matthew 13:43).

Daniel 12:4, and 9 speaks of the end of the age- the time when the miraculous gifts would end.

Notice my initial argument:

The charismata cease to function (be operative in the church) at the end of the age (Mr. Jackson agrees).

Daniel 12 predicts the end of the age, the time of the end. (Clearly, however, it is not the end of the Christian age!)

Therefore, Daniel 12 implicitly predicted the cessation of the charismata.

Notice now Daniel 12:6: “And one said to the man clothed in linen, who was above the waters of the river, “How long shall the fulfillment of these wonders be?”

Here is heaven’s divine, inspired and infallible answer: “Then I heard the man clothed in linen, who was above the waters of the river, when he held up his right hand and his left hand to heaven, and swore by Him who lives forever, that it shall be for a time, times, and half a time; and when the power of the holy people has been completely shattered, all these things shall be finished.”

So, we have the prediction of the end of the age– the time when the charismata would cease to be operative in the church.

We have on angel asking when those things would be fulfilled, v. 6.

We have heaven’s answer: “When the power of the holy people has been completely shattered, all of these things shall be finished.”

Note that the angel did not say that some of these things would be fulfilled.

The angel did not say that even most of those things would be fulfilled.

He said all of the things foretold, the great tribulation, the resurrection, the end of the age and the establishment of the kingdom would ALL be fulfilled when the power of the holy people was completely shattered.

Israel’s power– her only power— was her covenant with YHVH (cf, Deuteronomy 7)! That covenant was symbolized by the city, the temple, the priesthood, the sacrifices, the entire cultus.

Now, there can scarcely be any controversy as to when Israel’s power was completely shattered. Israel’s covenant with YHVH ended in t
he first century. God swept away every vestige of Israel’s power, when he swept away the city, the temple, the priesthood, the genealogies, the sacrifices. Of these truths there is no doubt, and there can be no refutation.

So, here is my argument:

The function of the charismata was to end at the end of the age.

Daniel 12 predicted that the end of the age would be when Israel’s power was completely shattered (Daniel 12:7).

Israel’s power– her covenantal standing with YHVH– was totally destroyed in AD 70. (I believe I am correct to affirm that Mr. Jackson does not believe that Israel will be completely shattered at the end of the Christian age!)

Therefore, the function of the charismata ceased in AD 70.

Notice a few closing corroborative thoughts.

Daniel 12 foretold the end of the age, the Great Tribulation, and the Abomination of Desolation.

Daniel 9:24-27 foretold the Great Tribulation and the Abomination of Desolation (Daniel 9:26-27)

Daniel posits those events at the time when “the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary” (Daniel 9:26-27).

Daniel 12 posits fulfillment of all of these events at the time when the power of the holy people is completely shattered.

Jesus emphatically posited the Abomination of Desolation and Great Tribulation in his generation (Matthew 24:15-21, 34).

Now notice: in predicting the AD 70 fall of Jerusalem, Jesus said “These be the days of vengeance when all things that are written shall be fulfilled.” Daniel clearly posited the fulfillment of all prophecy, including the Great Tribulation and Abomination at the time when the power of the holy people would be completely shattered, i.e. at the event Jesus was speaking about in Luke 21:20ff!

Thomas Ice, apologist for dispensationalism, inadvertently supports my contention. Commenting on Luke 21:22, Ice says “Those first century days are called the ‘days of vengeance’ for Jerusalem is under the divine judgment of covenantal sanctions recorded in Leviticus 26 and Deuteronomy 28. Luke notes that God’s vengeance on His elect nation ‘is in order that all things that are written may be fulfilled.’ Jesus is telling the nation that God will fulfill all the curses of the Mosaic Covenant because of Israel’s disobedience. He will not relent and merely bring to pass a partial fulfillment of His vengeance. Some of the passages that Jesus says will be fulfilled include the following: Leviticus 26:27-33; Deuteronomy 28:49-63; Deuteronomy 32:19-27; 1 Kings 9:1-9; Jeremiah 6:1-6; 26:1-9; Daniel 9:26…” (Kenneth Gentry and Thomas Ice, The Great Tribulation Past or Future, A Written Debate, Grand Rapids, Kregel, 1999, 98).

Note that Ice admits that AD 70 was a covenantal judgment. In fact, it was the complete, not partial, fulfillment of God’s covenantal wrath. AD 70 fulfilled Daniel 9:26!

The end of the age would be when the power of the holy people– God’s covenant with Israel– was completely shattered–this is the complete, not partial, outpouring of covenantal wrath.

But, AD 70 was the complete, not partial, outpouring of covenantal wrath on Israel.

Therefore, the end of the age– and by implication the end of the charismata– was in AD 70 in the full, not partial outpouring of covenant wrath.

Mr. Jackson can tell us if he disagrees with Ice’s assessment of the outpouring of covenant wrath in AD 70– and thus the end of the age. If he does not disagree, then this is a tacit admission that that power of the holy people, the end of the age, and the end of the charismata occurred in AD 70.

Summation:

There is much more I could present from Daniel. This will suffice.

I have demonstrated that only one age was to end, and that was the Mosaic age. The Christian age has no end. Since the charismata was to end at the end of the age, and the Christian age has no end, it is prima facie demonstrated that the gifts of the Spirit ended at the end of the only age that was to end, in AD 70 in the end of the Mosaic age.

From Daniel 9:24f I have proven the following:

I have established that all prophecy was to be fulfilled within the framework of the seventy weeks of Daniel 9.

Daniel 9 foretold the end of the age and establishment of the everlasting kingdom. This vindicates my claims in regard to end of the age being in AD 70.

I have proven that the destruction of Jerusalem, just like the making of the Atonement, belongs to the seventy week countdown. There was no 2000 year postponement of the countdown.

I have shown that the seventy weeks of Daniel 9 extended no further than the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70.

Thus, I have proven that the end of the prophetic office and the cessation of the charismata was at the time of, and no later than the fall of Jerusalem in AD 70.

From Daniel 12 I have proven the following:

Daniel 10-12 is concerned with the last days of Israel, not the last days of the (endless) Christian age.

Daniel 12 foretold the Great Tribulation, the resurrection, the end of the age and the Abomination of Desolation.

Daniel 12:7 says that all of those things– including the end of the age, and by implication the cessation of the charismata– would be fulfilled when the power of the holy people was completely shattered.

I have shown that the time when Israel’s power– her only power– was shattered, was in AD 70 when God himself removed her covenant, her city, her temple, her genealogies, her altar, her priesthood, her sacrifice, her cultus!

I have shown that the time for the fulfillment of all prophecy and the cessation of the prophetic office. It was to be at the time of the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70.

I have established that in Luke 21:20-24 Jesus fully concurred with Daniel 9 and 12 by saying emphatically and unambiguously that “all things that are written must be fulfilled” in the events of the fall of Jerusalem.

All things were fulfilled as Jesus said. The end of the age, and the end of the charismata occurred in AD 70.

 

SUBJECT: THE TIME OF THE CESSATION OF THE CHARISMATA

(THE MIRACULOUS GIFTS OF THE HOLY SPIRIT)?

FIRST AFFIRMATIVE BY DON K. PRESTON

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